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  1. 3 downloads

    Set in the mythical Heroic Age, Zeus doesn’t pretend to be an accurate historical simulation, a fact bemoaned by some of the series’ fans. The twelve chief deities of the Olympian pantheon will all periodically walk (or attack) the streets of your cities, and legendary monsters like the Minotaur and the Lernean Hydra will make snack food out of your hapless citizens. Great “heroes” such as Theseus and Hercules will come to your rescue if you meet their mercenary demands for cash, goods, and services. These mythological complications add serious tension to the scenarios where they occur. When an angry Poseidon destroys the water-born trade and fishing that a coastal city relies upon for survival, a real sense of urgency results. Still, the heart of Zeus lies in city design. Veterans of the previous games will immediately notice that Zeus features a somewhat simpler (and therefore faster-paced) approach to urban planning. Industrial, agricultural, military, and cultural buildings no longer send out “walkers” that need to find residential housing within a certain radius in order for the buildings to function. Instead, if there is available labor anywhere in the city, employees come to work. This makes the game easier than Caesar or Pharaoh, both of which forced you to place polluting industries close enough to housing to find workers. The fashion in which campaigns are structured is also greatly improved. Instead of forcing you to hack a brand-new city out of a howling wilderness in each scenario, most cities in Zeus carry forward into the next episode. For example, in the “Athens through the Ages” campaign, you’ll establish new cities (Athens and two colonies) in three of the eight scenarios. The remaining five episodes of the campaign build upon Athens’ early foundations, and in the process your creation will evolve from a minor village into the greatest city in Greece. And what a Greece it is! Past Impressions titles have done a poor job simulating the world surrounding your cities, at most allowing you to trade with a few neighbors and fulfill their requests for goods or troops. In Zeus, an entirely new political and economic model enables much more interesting interactions with the other city-states. Allied cities will still trade with you and make occasional requests, but you can finally badger them for goods too. Colonies and vassals pay annual resource tributes to your capital. Rival cities will sometimes attack you, but you can do the same. Better still, every action you take has diplomatic consequences. Conquering a rival, winning the Olympic Games, or fulfilling an ally’s request will improve your standing with other cities. Zeus is significantly different from previous titles and a worthy addition to the series. Its faster pace, simpler city design, and mythological elements open the game to more casual players.
  2. Zeus: Master of Olympus View File Set in the mythical Heroic Age, Zeus doesn’t pretend to be an accurate historical simulation, a fact bemoaned by some of the series’ fans. The twelve chief deities of the Olympian pantheon will all periodically walk (or attack) the streets of your cities, and legendary monsters like the Minotaur and the Lernean Hydra will make snack food out of your hapless citizens. Great “heroes” such as Theseus and Hercules will come to your rescue if you meet their mercenary demands for cash, goods, and services. These mythological complications add serious tension to the scenarios where they occur. When an angry Poseidon destroys the water-born trade and fishing that a coastal city relies upon for survival, a real sense of urgency results. Still, the heart of Zeus lies in city design. Veterans of the previous games will immediately notice that Zeus features a somewhat simpler (and therefore faster-paced) approach to urban planning. Industrial, agricultural, military, and cultural buildings no longer send out “walkers” that need to find residential housing within a certain radius in order for the buildings to function. Instead, if there is available labor anywhere in the city, employees come to work. This makes the game easier than Caesar or Pharaoh, both of which forced you to place polluting industries close enough to housing to find workers. The fashion in which campaigns are structured is also greatly improved. Instead of forcing you to hack a brand-new city out of a howling wilderness in each scenario, most cities in Zeus carry forward into the next episode. For example, in the “Athens through the Ages” campaign, you’ll establish new cities (Athens and two colonies) in three of the eight scenarios. The remaining five episodes of the campaign build upon Athens’ early foundations, and in the process your creation will evolve from a minor village into the greatest city in Greece. And what a Greece it is! Past Impressions titles have done a poor job simulating the world surrounding your cities, at most allowing you to trade with a few neighbors and fulfill their requests for goods or troops. In Zeus, an entirely new political and economic model enables much more interesting interactions with the other city-states. Allied cities will still trade with you and make occasional requests, but you can finally badger them for goods too. Colonies and vassals pay annual resource tributes to your capital. Rival cities will sometimes attack you, but you can do the same. Better still, every action you take has diplomatic consequences. Conquering a rival, winning the Olympic Games, or fulfilling an ally’s request will improve your standing with other cities. Zeus is significantly different from previous titles and a worthy addition to the series. Its faster pace, simpler city design, and mythological elements open the game to more casual players. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  3. 4 downloads

    Most of the team at developer Tilted Mill worked at Impressions, which created the Caesar series. After producing the similar city builder Children of the Nile on its own, the developer returns to its original series with Caesar IV. Caesar IV is a fairly typical city management game. You build up a Roman city, only this time it's in full 3D. You create trade networks, fight off the occasional invasion, and keep those peons working. You’re rated in five categories, including culture (religion and entertainment), security (local police, firefighters, city defenses), prosperity (how much your citizens have upgraded their homes), favor (how well you’ve met Rome’s demands), and population. You also need to make money so you can expand your city, and keep your people happy so that they’ll continue moving it. The real issue with Caesar IV is that it’s a bit too typical as a city builder, and is also hampered by a not so intuitive interface. Consider Rome’s demands. You’ll often get requests from Rome for certain resources. This is a good thing since it gives you mini-goals to work towards, but the interface for accessing and stockpiling resources takes far too much drilling through the cumbersome advisor’s menu. When you have to engage in the same sequence of click-click-click for every demand from Rome, well… it just gets annoying.
  4. Caesar IV View File Most of the team at developer Tilted Mill worked at Impressions, which created the Caesar series. After producing the similar city builder Children of the Nile on its own, the developer returns to its original series with Caesar IV. Caesar IV is a fairly typical city management game. You build up a Roman city, only this time it's in full 3D. You create trade networks, fight off the occasional invasion, and keep those peons working. You’re rated in five categories, including culture (religion and entertainment), security (local police, firefighters, city defenses), prosperity (how much your citizens have upgraded their homes), favor (how well you’ve met Rome’s demands), and population. You also need to make money so you can expand your city, and keep your people happy so that they’ll continue moving it. The real issue with Caesar IV is that it’s a bit too typical as a city builder, and is also hampered by a not so intuitive interface. Consider Rome’s demands. You’ll often get requests from Rome for certain resources. This is a good thing since it gives you mini-goals to work towards, but the interface for accessing and stockpiling resources takes far too much drilling through the cumbersome advisor’s menu. When you have to engage in the same sequence of click-click-click for every demand from Rome, well… it just gets annoying. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  5. 7 downloads

    Designing your first amusement park isn’t actually that tough, but once things are up and running do the headaches begin. The key to your theme park’s success hangs on how happy your customers are. Sure, they’ll come to investigate when it opens, but if they don’t like it (if it’s too dirty, boring, lacking key facilities or if the rides look unsafe) then they won’t be coming back for a second visit. Even worse, they might convince their friends not to go. For this reason, you have to think everything from how much to charge for a hot dog to designing your rollercoaster. One of the other cool, more subtle features of the game is that the quality of people change depending on what kind of a park you’ve built. If your park is very safe and quiet, you’ll be seeing a lot of old folk wandering around. If it has a lot of dangerous and noisy rides then you’ll see younger thrill-seekers visiting. But typically the better way to go is to try to please as many people as possible – provide long, safe rides, have food and drinks nearby, and keep your park clean. Most of the fun of Theme Park is finding that balance that secures your park’s money-making future.
  6. 6 downloads

    This game tries very seriously not to be taken seriously, and succeeds through the inclusion of humorous diseases and even more hilarious treatments. Take, for example, The King Complex. As tragic folks taken over by the spirit of Elvis himself (who took a hiatus from the grocery store tabloids just to grace this game), only the fine-tuned skills of a psychiatrist will meet the needs of these patients. Or Slack Tongue, caused by the excessive discussion of soap operas. Only cure? Chop the tongue off with quick, efficient, and painful ease. At first, it'll take a little time to figure out the necessary steps to make each hospital run smoothly. After a couple hours, the mechanics of game play become autonomic, allowing gamers to adjust their focus to the actual needs at hand. There's no feature more welcome than the speed adjustment, set anywhere from a crawling speed to Dead before they're through the door mode. It's easy for the amount of decisions and tasks to overwhelm you in the blink of an eye. Being able to adjust the speed of the game brings welcome relief when it's most needed.
  7. 4 downloads

    SimCity 3000 is an economic game released in 1999 by Electronic Arts, Inc. The game was released for PC (Windows) and Macintosh. In the game, you play the mayor. Our task is to manage the city. We start the game on an empty area where we will develop our city. In selected sectors, you can create zones for residential, commercial and industrial purposes. In addition to the division into zones, you can build roads, parks, trains, water pipes, power plants and many more. Your task is to create a thriving city. If you fail - you will be deprived of office.
  8. 3 downloads

    The evolution of Caesar 3 is similar to Civilization II, with the cumulative effect of the improvements over past entries resulting in a much more engaging, enjoyable, and yes, addictive game. The primary improvements come in several flavors: graphics, economic, religious, political, and social models; and in consolidating almost all activities onto a single map. Because of the latter, players can spend more time concentrating on creating the necessary infrastructure required for a functioning Roman city. Compared to Caesar 2, the emphasis is on economics and not military activity. The multiple demands for growth, current revenue, and risk management will keep even the most brilliant governor glued to the monitor. At the macro level, there are numerous issues the aspiring governor must address. Ensuring an adequate food supply is critical because without food you get no immigrants, thus no city. Establishing industries, infrastructure and proper export/import channels to maximize income are vital to success. City developments grinds to a halt without cash. Establishing the proper security environment is also enjoyably represented. In low-threat provinces, players need only make enough prefects (police stations), but in militarily threatened areas players must create proper army defenses. Without security there are no economics as the enemy has a nasty habit of attempting to level player’s cities. At the earlier levels, barbarians are poorly organized and motivated, and don’t present much of a threat. Things change dramatically later on. Creating and managing legions is an important skill, and also a lot of fun. At the micro level, players will find themselves constantly challenged in the battle for resources. A key to city (and personal) survival is early economic development. This risks fire, famine and falling buildings, but manufacturing of all sorts provides the majority of income. The point at which your city turns the corner and becomes a paying concern gives a great shot of satisfaction, and players can then turn their attention towards making the myriad improvements required to expand the population and tax base. Caesar III puts together several different moving pieces into an attractive, challenging, and addictive package. Balancing the competing demands for resources, taxation, security, development, and economic activity will stress the skills of the most skillful strategy gamers. The game is economically oriented, but there is enough military play to keep the aspiring centurions among the crowd interested, and so they should.
  9. 3 downloads

    Pharaoh is an isometric city-building game that was released on October 31, 1999, created by Impressions Games and published by Sierra Studios, for Microsoft Windows. Using the same game engine and principles of Caesar III (also by Sierra Entertainment), it is the first such game in Sierra's City Building series to focus on another civilization of ancient times. Players oversee the construction and management of cities and settlements in Ancient Egypt, micro-managing every aspect of the city to ensure citizens are fed, employed, healthy and protected from diseases, disasters and wars. An expansion pack, Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile, was released in 2000, developed by BreakAway Games. In 2001, both the game and expansion pack were bundled together as Pharaoh Gold.[1] In August 2020, a remake titled Pharaoh: A New Era was announced by Triskell Interactive and Dotemu to be released in 2021.
  10. 4 downloads

    If you want a famous point of comparison with Alien Legacy, that would be Outpost. Those of you who have played through 4x games probably know what it’s all about. But believe it or not, Alien Legacy is actually even more stressful and harder to get into than Outpost, which was no walk in the park either. It can go the point that the game feels more like a job than an actual game. The game has three distinctive parts: global strategy, colony management and searching planets. The strategy mostly involves sending out ships to new planets to colonize. Research is powered by “research points” in different categories, e.g. biology or math, which are gathered when searching sectors. By using those points the player gets different technologies of various use like more productive mines or a better range for space ships. Lastly the colonies are viewed from a top-down perspective. Here the player constructs up to 16 buildings to produce resources or space ships. Those buildings have to be maintained or can be upgraded/replaced with the newest research achievements. Every colony also needs a steady number of people, material and robots. Perhaps the main reason why the game isn’t all that fun is because of the mundane nature of the taks you have to undertake in order to run your empire. You can decide where to build factories, but this is mundane since you can place them anywhere. What’s more, the action sequences, where you fly a small probe around looking for minerals, is neither fun nor pretty to look at.
  11. Alien Legacy View File If you want a famous point of comparison with Alien Legacy, that would be Outpost. Those of you who have played through 4x games probably know what it’s all about. But believe it or not, Alien Legacy is actually even more stressful and harder to get into than Outpost, which was no walk in the park either. It can go the point that the game feels more like a job than an actual game. The game has three distinctive parts: global strategy, colony management and searching planets. The strategy mostly involves sending out ships to new planets to colonize. Research is powered by “research points” in different categories, e.g. biology or math, which are gathered when searching sectors. By using those points the player gets different technologies of various use like more productive mines or a better range for space ships. Lastly the colonies are viewed from a top-down perspective. Here the player constructs up to 16 buildings to produce resources or space ships. Those buildings have to be maintained or can be upgraded/replaced with the newest research achievements. Every colony also needs a steady number of people, material and robots. Perhaps the main reason why the game isn’t all that fun is because of the mundane nature of the taks you have to undertake in order to run your empire. You can decide where to build factories, but this is mundane since you can place them anywhere. What’s more, the action sequences, where you fly a small probe around looking for minerals, is neither fun nor pretty to look at. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  12. SirMadsen

    Pharaoh

    Pharaoh View File Pharaoh is an isometric city-building game that was released on October 31, 1999, created by Impressions Games and published by Sierra Studios, for Microsoft Windows. Using the same game engine and principles of Caesar III (also by Sierra Entertainment), it is the first such game in Sierra's City Building series to focus on another civilization of ancient times. Players oversee the construction and management of cities and settlements in Ancient Egypt, micro-managing every aspect of the city to ensure citizens are fed, employed, healthy and protected from diseases, disasters and wars. An expansion pack, Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile, was released in 2000, developed by BreakAway Games. In 2001, both the game and expansion pack were bundled together as Pharaoh Gold.[1] In August 2020, a remake titled Pharaoh: A New Era was announced by Triskell Interactive and Dotemu to be released in 2021. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  13. Caesar III View File The evolution of Caesar 3 is similar to Civilization II, with the cumulative effect of the improvements over past entries resulting in a much more engaging, enjoyable, and yes, addictive game. The primary improvements come in several flavors: graphics, economic, religious, political, and social models; and in consolidating almost all activities onto a single map. Because of the latter, players can spend more time concentrating on creating the necessary infrastructure required for a functioning Roman city. Compared to Caesar 2, the emphasis is on economics and not military activity. The multiple demands for growth, current revenue, and risk management will keep even the most brilliant governor glued to the monitor. At the macro level, there are numerous issues the aspiring governor must address. Ensuring an adequate food supply is critical because without food you get no immigrants, thus no city. Establishing industries, infrastructure and proper export/import channels to maximize income are vital to success. City developments grinds to a halt without cash. Establishing the proper security environment is also enjoyably represented. In low-threat provinces, players need only make enough prefects (police stations), but in militarily threatened areas players must create proper army defenses. Without security there are no economics as the enemy has a nasty habit of attempting to level player’s cities. At the earlier levels, barbarians are poorly organized and motivated, and don’t present much of a threat. Things change dramatically later on. Creating and managing legions is an important skill, and also a lot of fun. At the micro level, players will find themselves constantly challenged in the battle for resources. A key to city (and personal) survival is early economic development. This risks fire, famine and falling buildings, but manufacturing of all sorts provides the majority of income. The point at which your city turns the corner and becomes a paying concern gives a great shot of satisfaction, and players can then turn their attention towards making the myriad improvements required to expand the population and tax base. Caesar III puts together several different moving pieces into an attractive, challenging, and addictive package. Balancing the competing demands for resources, taxation, security, development, and economic activity will stress the skills of the most skillful strategy gamers. The game is economically oriented, but there is enough military play to keep the aspiring centurions among the crowd interested, and so they should. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  14. Simcity 3000 View File SimCity 3000 is an economic game released in 1999 by Electronic Arts, Inc. The game was released for PC (Windows) and Macintosh. In the game, you play the mayor. Our task is to manage the city. We start the game on an empty area where we will develop our city. In selected sectors, you can create zones for residential, commercial and industrial purposes. In addition to the division into zones, you can build roads, parks, trains, water pipes, power plants and many more. Your task is to create a thriving city. If you fail - you will be deprived of office. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Simulation  
  15. Dune Dynasty View File Free video game "Dune Dynasty" v1.5.7 (probably final) for Windows, an enhanced porting of classic DOS game "Dune II" / "Dune 2". It's faithful to the original, but adds a modern interface, a single-player skirmish mode, a player of original cutscenes and soundtrack, and optional features. The zip already includes: Required data files from original Dune 2 Some popular mods (Dune 2 eXtended, Super Dune II Classic v1.5g, MrFlibble's Alternate Scenarios, Atreides by Stefan Hendriks), select them by clicking red subtitle in main menu Many options are available only by editing the text file "dunedynasty.cfg" before running the program, including changing the language. All languages of the original game are available (some new menu texts are in English only; Italian and Spanish use English voices). NOTE for French/German: to select these languages, you have to remove from \data subfolder all .FRE or .GER files (yes, remove; they're actually Ita and Spa and Dune Dynasty gives precedence to them). NOTE for mods: custom text only works if English is set. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  16. Version 1.5.7

    7 downloads

    Free video game "Dune Dynasty" v1.5.7 (probably final) for Windows, an enhanced porting of classic DOS game "Dune II" / "Dune 2". It's faithful to the original, but adds a modern interface, a single-player skirmish mode, a player of original cutscenes and soundtrack, and optional features. The zip already includes: Required data files from original Dune 2 Some popular mods (Dune 2 eXtended, Super Dune II Classic v1.5g, MrFlibble's Alternate Scenarios, Atreides by Stefan Hendriks), select them by clicking red subtitle in main menu Many options are available only by editing the text file "dunedynasty.cfg" before running the program, including changing the language. All languages of the original game are available (some new menu texts are in English only; Italian and Spanish use English voices). NOTE for French/German: to select these languages, you have to remove from \data subfolder all .FRE or .GER files (yes, remove; they're actually Ita and Spa and Dune Dynasty gives precedence to them). NOTE for mods: custom text only works if English is set.
  17. Theme Hospital View File This game tries very seriously not to be taken seriously, and succeeds through the inclusion of humorous diseases and even more hilarious treatments. Take, for example, The King Complex. As tragic folks taken over by the spirit of Elvis himself (who took a hiatus from the grocery store tabloids just to grace this game), only the fine-tuned skills of a psychiatrist will meet the needs of these patients. Or Slack Tongue, caused by the excessive discussion of soap operas. Only cure? Chop the tongue off with quick, efficient, and painful ease. At first, it'll take a little time to figure out the necessary steps to make each hospital run smoothly. After a couple hours, the mechanics of game play become autonomic, allowing gamers to adjust their focus to the actual needs at hand. There's no feature more welcome than the speed adjustment, set anywhere from a crawling speed to Dead before they're through the door mode. It's easy for the amount of decisions and tasks to overwhelm you in the blink of an eye. Being able to adjust the speed of the game brings welcome relief when it's most needed. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  18. Theme Park View File Designing your first amusement park isn’t actually that tough, but once things are up and running do the headaches begin. The key to your theme park’s success hangs on how happy your customers are. Sure, they’ll come to investigate when it opens, but if they don’t like it (if it’s too dirty, boring, lacking key facilities or if the rides look unsafe) then they won’t be coming back for a second visit. Even worse, they might convince their friends not to go. For this reason, you have to think everything from how much to charge for a hot dog to designing your rollercoaster. One of the other cool, more subtle features of the game is that the quality of people change depending on what kind of a park you’ve built. If your park is very safe and quiet, you’ll be seeing a lot of old folk wandering around. If it has a lot of dangerous and noisy rides then you’ll see younger thrill-seekers visiting. But typically the better way to go is to try to please as many people as possible – provide long, safe rides, have food and drinks nearby, and keep your park clean. Most of the fun of Theme Park is finding that balance that secures your park’s money-making future. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  19. 6 downloads

    There are two ways to play the game: Instant Action and Full Simulation. In the first mode you don’t have to worry about things like finances, but you’re also limited to the number of items you get to place in the park. In Full Sim mode, your tasks include researching rides and ride upgrades, setting the ticket price (for the whole park only – rides are free to paying customers) and concession prices, and managing a staff of janitors, mechanics, security people, researchers, and entertainers. Your staff needs direction in order to function with anything resembling efficiency. This means that every time you add to your park, you must hire new staff and set their patrols to cover the new area. Don’t even think about letting these palookas operate autonomously. In my first game, I didn’t set any patrol areas for my workers, and within minutes the park was filled with garbage, fouled bathrooms, and rampant criminal activity. Having to perform this ritual each time you expand the park makes the gameplay very formulaic and tedious.
  20. Sim Theme Park View File There are two ways to play the game: Instant Action and Full Simulation. In the first mode you don’t have to worry about things like finances, but you’re also limited to the number of items you get to place in the park. In Full Sim mode, your tasks include researching rides and ride upgrades, setting the ticket price (for the whole park only – rides are free to paying customers) and concession prices, and managing a staff of janitors, mechanics, security people, researchers, and entertainers. Your staff needs direction in order to function with anything resembling efficiency. This means that every time you add to your park, you must hire new staff and set their patrols to cover the new area. Don’t even think about letting these palookas operate autonomously. In my first game, I didn’t set any patrol areas for my workers, and within minutes the park was filled with garbage, fouled bathrooms, and rampant criminal activity. Having to perform this ritual each time you expand the park makes the gameplay very formulaic and tedious. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  21. SirMadsen

    SimFarm

    6 downloads

    SimFarm another game from the Sim family. In this game you get into the role of an American farmer. You have to take care of your crop, maintain it and exaggerate. Later, you have to prove yourself as a farmer-economist and then monetize your crop. However, grasshoppers, tornadoes and a few other inconveniences that you will have to deal with will stand up to you. Game-play includes planting and maintaining crops, of which there are 24 different varieties to choose from, each with their own requirements. The buying and selling of livestock, and land, whilst competing for space with the town. Additional simulation includes changing weather systems and realistic seasons, each affecting the running of your farm.
  22. SirMadsen

    SimFarm

    SimFarm View File SimFarm another game from the Sim family. In this game you get into the role of an American farmer. You have to take care of your crop, maintain it and exaggerate. Later, you have to prove yourself as a farmer-economist and then monetize your crop. However, grasshoppers, tornadoes and a few other inconveniences that you will have to deal with will stand up to you. Game-play includes planting and maintaining crops, of which there are 24 different varieties to choose from, each with their own requirements. The buying and selling of livestock, and land, whilst competing for space with the town. Additional simulation includes changing weather systems and realistic seasons, each affecting the running of your farm. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  23. SirMadsen

    OpenRA

    OpenRA View File OpenRA is a project that recreates and modernizes the classic Command & Conquer real time strategy games. We have developed a flexible open source game engine (the OpenRA engine) that provides a common platform for rebuilding and reimagining classic 2D and 2.5D RTS games (the OpenRA mods). This means that OpenRA is not restricted by the technical limitations of the original closed-source games: it includes native support for modern operating systems and screen resolutions (including Windows 10, Mac OS X, and most Linux distros) without relying on emulation or binary hacks, and features integrated online multiplayer. While we love the classic RTS gameplay, multiplayer game design has evolved significantly since the early 1990’s. The OpenRA mods include new features and gameplay improvements that bring them into the modern era: A choice between “right click” and classic “left click” control schemes Overhauled sidebar interfaces for managing production Support for game replays and an observer interface designed for streaming games online The “fog of war” that obscures the battlefield outside your units’ line of sight Civilian structures that can be captured for strategic advantage Units gain experience as they fight and improve when they earn new ranks OpenRA is 100% free, and comes bundled with three distinct mods. When you run a mod for the first time the game can automatically download the original game assets, or you can use the original game disks. Tiberian Dawn An alliance of nations fights to protect Europe and northern Africa from a mysterious terrorist organization and the valuable but toxic alien mineral, Tiberium, that is slowly spreading over the world. The Tiberian Dawn mod focuses on fast and fluid play, taking heavy influences from modern RTS games. Red Alert In a world where rainbow was assassinated and the Third Reich never existed, the Soviet Union seeks power over all of Europe. Allied against this Evil Empire, the free world faces a Cold War turned hot. The Red Alert mod focuses on strategy, providing a range of units and tactics to conquer the land, sea, and air. Dune 2000 Three great houses fight for the precious spice melange. He who controls the spice controls the universe! Establish a foothold on the desert planet Arrakis, where your biggest threat is the environment. The Dune 2000 mod currently focuses on providing an experience that is authentic to the original game. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  24. Version 20210321

    5 downloads

    OpenRA is a project that recreates and modernizes the classic Command & Conquer real time strategy games. We have developed a flexible open source game engine (the OpenRA engine) that provides a common platform for rebuilding and reimagining classic 2D and 2.5D RTS games (the OpenRA mods). This means that OpenRA is not restricted by the technical limitations of the original closed-source games: it includes native support for modern operating systems and screen resolutions (including Windows 10, Mac OS X, and most Linux distros) without relying on emulation or binary hacks, and features integrated online multiplayer. While we love the classic RTS gameplay, multiplayer game design has evolved significantly since the early 1990’s. The OpenRA mods include new features and gameplay improvements that bring them into the modern era: A choice between “right click” and classic “left click” control schemes Overhauled sidebar interfaces for managing production Support for game replays and an observer interface designed for streaming games online The “fog of war” that obscures the battlefield outside your units’ line of sight Civilian structures that can be captured for strategic advantage Units gain experience as they fight and improve when they earn new ranks OpenRA is 100% free, and comes bundled with three distinct mods. When you run a mod for the first time the game can automatically download the original game assets, or you can use the original game disks. Tiberian Dawn An alliance of nations fights to protect Europe and northern Africa from a mysterious terrorist organization and the valuable but toxic alien mineral, Tiberium, that is slowly spreading over the world. The Tiberian Dawn mod focuses on fast and fluid play, taking heavy influences from modern RTS games. Red Alert In a world where rainbow was assassinated and the Third Reich never existed, the Soviet Union seeks power over all of Europe. Allied against this Evil Empire, the free world faces a Cold War turned hot. The Red Alert mod focuses on strategy, providing a range of units and tactics to conquer the land, sea, and air. Dune 2000 Three great houses fight for the precious spice melange. He who controls the spice controls the universe! Establish a foothold on the desert planet Arrakis, where your biggest threat is the environment. The Dune 2000 mod currently focuses on providing an experience that is authentic to the original game.
  25. 2 downloads

    At the time, this game made a real revolution. There were no superheroes, ancient secrets and half-naked beauties with submachine guns, you didn't wear commando's camouflage pants and you didn't hold a cold steel pistol in your hand. You have lived in an ordinary life in a virtual world. Tie a Hermes tie around your neck, get a Samsonite briefcase and go to work. Yes, what else did you expect? You have to make money to get your wife happy, and it's high time to buy a big TV. Neighbours are coming to visit, you have to get ready. Welcome to life. Sims are like humans. Only tiny. Each of them has an impressive number of needs - from the most primitive to the highly spiritual - satisfy them, otherwise you will get a "completely dissatisfied person". Don't forget that you are not alone here - it would be nice to take care of your loved ones as well. The sims around you (I almost wrote "people") will run to you to meet, communicate, and then, maybe, they'll come to the wedding (no, what you think they'll show won't show what a pity). Of course, everything depends on you - you can be a smelly neighbor with a dirty driveway and dirty shoes, no one will even look at you. But if you become a charming handsome man, you will immediately make a fuss and the Sims from all around will start coming to you (and emptying your refrigerator).
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