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Found 10 results

  1. 3 downloads

    Set in the mythical Heroic Age, Zeus doesn’t pretend to be an accurate historical simulation, a fact bemoaned by some of the series’ fans. The twelve chief deities of the Olympian pantheon will all periodically walk (or attack) the streets of your cities, and legendary monsters like the Minotaur and the Lernean Hydra will make snack food out of your hapless citizens. Great “heroes” such as Theseus and Hercules will come to your rescue if you meet their mercenary demands for cash, goods, and services. These mythological complications add serious tension to the scenarios where they occur. When an angry Poseidon destroys the water-born trade and fishing that a coastal city relies upon for survival, a real sense of urgency results. Still, the heart of Zeus lies in city design. Veterans of the previous games will immediately notice that Zeus features a somewhat simpler (and therefore faster-paced) approach to urban planning. Industrial, agricultural, military, and cultural buildings no longer send out “walkers” that need to find residential housing within a certain radius in order for the buildings to function. Instead, if there is available labor anywhere in the city, employees come to work. This makes the game easier than Caesar or Pharaoh, both of which forced you to place polluting industries close enough to housing to find workers. The fashion in which campaigns are structured is also greatly improved. Instead of forcing you to hack a brand-new city out of a howling wilderness in each scenario, most cities in Zeus carry forward into the next episode. For example, in the “Athens through the Ages” campaign, you’ll establish new cities (Athens and two colonies) in three of the eight scenarios. The remaining five episodes of the campaign build upon Athens’ early foundations, and in the process your creation will evolve from a minor village into the greatest city in Greece. And what a Greece it is! Past Impressions titles have done a poor job simulating the world surrounding your cities, at most allowing you to trade with a few neighbors and fulfill their requests for goods or troops. In Zeus, an entirely new political and economic model enables much more interesting interactions with the other city-states. Allied cities will still trade with you and make occasional requests, but you can finally badger them for goods too. Colonies and vassals pay annual resource tributes to your capital. Rival cities will sometimes attack you, but you can do the same. Better still, every action you take has diplomatic consequences. Conquering a rival, winning the Olympic Games, or fulfilling an ally’s request will improve your standing with other cities. Zeus is significantly different from previous titles and a worthy addition to the series. Its faster pace, simpler city design, and mythological elements open the game to more casual players.
  2. Zeus: Master of Olympus View File Set in the mythical Heroic Age, Zeus doesn’t pretend to be an accurate historical simulation, a fact bemoaned by some of the series’ fans. The twelve chief deities of the Olympian pantheon will all periodically walk (or attack) the streets of your cities, and legendary monsters like the Minotaur and the Lernean Hydra will make snack food out of your hapless citizens. Great “heroes” such as Theseus and Hercules will come to your rescue if you meet their mercenary demands for cash, goods, and services. These mythological complications add serious tension to the scenarios where they occur. When an angry Poseidon destroys the water-born trade and fishing that a coastal city relies upon for survival, a real sense of urgency results. Still, the heart of Zeus lies in city design. Veterans of the previous games will immediately notice that Zeus features a somewhat simpler (and therefore faster-paced) approach to urban planning. Industrial, agricultural, military, and cultural buildings no longer send out “walkers” that need to find residential housing within a certain radius in order for the buildings to function. Instead, if there is available labor anywhere in the city, employees come to work. This makes the game easier than Caesar or Pharaoh, both of which forced you to place polluting industries close enough to housing to find workers. The fashion in which campaigns are structured is also greatly improved. Instead of forcing you to hack a brand-new city out of a howling wilderness in each scenario, most cities in Zeus carry forward into the next episode. For example, in the “Athens through the Ages” campaign, you’ll establish new cities (Athens and two colonies) in three of the eight scenarios. The remaining five episodes of the campaign build upon Athens’ early foundations, and in the process your creation will evolve from a minor village into the greatest city in Greece. And what a Greece it is! Past Impressions titles have done a poor job simulating the world surrounding your cities, at most allowing you to trade with a few neighbors and fulfill their requests for goods or troops. In Zeus, an entirely new political and economic model enables much more interesting interactions with the other city-states. Allied cities will still trade with you and make occasional requests, but you can finally badger them for goods too. Colonies and vassals pay annual resource tributes to your capital. Rival cities will sometimes attack you, but you can do the same. Better still, every action you take has diplomatic consequences. Conquering a rival, winning the Olympic Games, or fulfilling an ally’s request will improve your standing with other cities. Zeus is significantly different from previous titles and a worthy addition to the series. Its faster pace, simpler city design, and mythological elements open the game to more casual players. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  3. 3 downloads

    The evolution of Caesar 3 is similar to Civilization II, with the cumulative effect of the improvements over past entries resulting in a much more engaging, enjoyable, and yes, addictive game. The primary improvements come in several flavors: graphics, economic, religious, political, and social models; and in consolidating almost all activities onto a single map. Because of the latter, players can spend more time concentrating on creating the necessary infrastructure required for a functioning Roman city. Compared to Caesar 2, the emphasis is on economics and not military activity. The multiple demands for growth, current revenue, and risk management will keep even the most brilliant governor glued to the monitor. At the macro level, there are numerous issues the aspiring governor must address. Ensuring an adequate food supply is critical because without food you get no immigrants, thus no city. Establishing industries, infrastructure and proper export/import channels to maximize income are vital to success. City developments grinds to a halt without cash. Establishing the proper security environment is also enjoyably represented. In low-threat provinces, players need only make enough prefects (police stations), but in militarily threatened areas players must create proper army defenses. Without security there are no economics as the enemy has a nasty habit of attempting to level player’s cities. At the earlier levels, barbarians are poorly organized and motivated, and don’t present much of a threat. Things change dramatically later on. Creating and managing legions is an important skill, and also a lot of fun. At the micro level, players will find themselves constantly challenged in the battle for resources. A key to city (and personal) survival is early economic development. This risks fire, famine and falling buildings, but manufacturing of all sorts provides the majority of income. The point at which your city turns the corner and becomes a paying concern gives a great shot of satisfaction, and players can then turn their attention towards making the myriad improvements required to expand the population and tax base. Caesar III puts together several different moving pieces into an attractive, challenging, and addictive package. Balancing the competing demands for resources, taxation, security, development, and economic activity will stress the skills of the most skillful strategy gamers. The game is economically oriented, but there is enough military play to keep the aspiring centurions among the crowd interested, and so they should.
  4. 3 downloads

    Pharaoh is an isometric city-building game that was released on October 31, 1999, created by Impressions Games and published by Sierra Studios, for Microsoft Windows. Using the same game engine and principles of Caesar III (also by Sierra Entertainment), it is the first such game in Sierra's City Building series to focus on another civilization of ancient times. Players oversee the construction and management of cities and settlements in Ancient Egypt, micro-managing every aspect of the city to ensure citizens are fed, employed, healthy and protected from diseases, disasters and wars. An expansion pack, Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile, was released in 2000, developed by BreakAway Games. In 2001, both the game and expansion pack were bundled together as Pharaoh Gold.[1] In August 2020, a remake titled Pharaoh: A New Era was announced by Triskell Interactive and Dotemu to be released in 2021.
  5. SirMadsen

    Pharaoh

    Pharaoh View File Pharaoh is an isometric city-building game that was released on October 31, 1999, created by Impressions Games and published by Sierra Studios, for Microsoft Windows. Using the same game engine and principles of Caesar III (also by Sierra Entertainment), it is the first such game in Sierra's City Building series to focus on another civilization of ancient times. Players oversee the construction and management of cities and settlements in Ancient Egypt, micro-managing every aspect of the city to ensure citizens are fed, employed, healthy and protected from diseases, disasters and wars. An expansion pack, Cleopatra: Queen of the Nile, was released in 2000, developed by BreakAway Games. In 2001, both the game and expansion pack were bundled together as Pharaoh Gold.[1] In August 2020, a remake titled Pharaoh: A New Era was announced by Triskell Interactive and Dotemu to be released in 2021. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/15/2022 Category Strategy  
  6. Caesar III View File The evolution of Caesar 3 is similar to Civilization II, with the cumulative effect of the improvements over past entries resulting in a much more engaging, enjoyable, and yes, addictive game. The primary improvements come in several flavors: graphics, economic, religious, political, and social models; and in consolidating almost all activities onto a single map. Because of the latter, players can spend more time concentrating on creating the necessary infrastructure required for a functioning Roman city. Compared to Caesar 2, the emphasis is on economics and not military activity. The multiple demands for growth, current revenue, and risk management will keep even the most brilliant governor glued to the monitor. At the macro level, there are numerous issues the aspiring governor must address. Ensuring an adequate food supply is critical because without food you get no immigrants, thus no city. Establishing industries, infrastructure and proper export/import channels to maximize income are vital to success. City developments grinds to a halt without cash. Establishing the proper security environment is also enjoyably represented. In low-threat provinces, players need only make enough prefects (police stations), but in militarily threatened areas players must create proper army defenses. Without security there are no economics as the enemy has a nasty habit of attempting to level player’s cities. At the earlier levels, barbarians are poorly organized and motivated, and don’t present much of a threat. Things change dramatically later on. Creating and managing legions is an important skill, and also a lot of fun. At the micro level, players will find themselves constantly challenged in the battle for resources. A key to city (and personal) survival is early economic development. This risks fire, famine and falling buildings, but manufacturing of all sorts provides the majority of income. The point at which your city turns the corner and becomes a paying concern gives a great shot of satisfaction, and players can then turn their attention towards making the myriad improvements required to expand the population and tax base. Caesar III puts together several different moving pieces into an attractive, challenging, and addictive package. Balancing the competing demands for resources, taxation, security, development, and economic activity will stress the skills of the most skillful strategy gamers. The game is economically oriented, but there is enough military play to keep the aspiring centurions among the crowd interested, and so they should. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/14/2022 Category Strategy  
  7. 5 downloads

    As the game name itself suggests - plot of the game takes place in the past, namely in 200 BC, in the Roman era. Your task is to help Caesar to develop and expand his empire by conquering new territory, where you build new cities. You start with a small village and you need to further develop and take care of it. You must provide drinking water, education, protection, entertainment and all the other typical urban stuff for city residents. You must also think of the external protection of the city, because many barbarian hordes may attack your city. If you manage to solve all these things, you might eventually become the new Caesar. If you like SimCity and Civilization, you'll love the game Caesar 2 too.
  8. SirMadsen

    Caesar

    3 downloads

    Caesar is a clone of Civilization from the period of the Roman Empire. You must build a city, take care of its key features, such as: settlement, roads, police, water supply, social events etc. You are not limited to one city - you can build other areas, unite them with roads, once you find out the first one works just fine. You do not have to worry about everything yourself, you can have slaves who are gonna help you.
  9. SirMadsen

    Caesar

    Caesar View File Caesar is a clone of Civilization from the period of the Roman Empire. You must build a city, take care of its key features, such as: settlement, roads, police, water supply, social events etc. You are not limited to one city - you can build other areas, unite them with roads, once you find out the first one works just fine. You do not have to worry about everything yourself, you can have slaves who are gonna help you. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/13/2022 Category Strategy  
  10. SirMadsen

    Caesar II

    Caesar II View File As the game name itself suggests - plot of the game takes place in the past, namely in 200 BC, in the Roman era. Your task is to help Caesar to develop and expand his empire by conquering new territory, where you build new cities. You start with a small village and you need to further develop and take care of it. You must provide drinking water, education, protection, entertainment and all the other typical urban stuff for city residents. You must also think of the external protection of the city, because many barbarian hordes may attack your city. If you manage to solve all these things, you might eventually become the new Caesar. If you like SimCity and Civilization, you'll love the game Caesar 2 too. Submitter SirMadsen Submitted 01/13/2022 Category Strategy  
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